History
Mochica pottery (I – VI century) representing vegetables they used to consume at that time such as “lucuma”, “guanábana”, “corn” and pumpking
INFLUENCES

When the great culinary destinations of the world are discussed, Peru is not likely to be often mentioned. However, in recent years it has begun to be recognized as a place with an extremely diverse and delicious selection of cuisine. The country not only has a great variety of traditional fare, but also a unique selection of fusions. This is due to the country's unique geography, its openness to blend races and cultures, and its use of ancient cuisine techniques in modern dishes.

Peru has seen immigration from countries such as Spain, Britain, China, Africa, Japan and Italy. The cooking methods and cuisine types from these countries has been mixed with traditional Peruvian methods, which has created very unique and flavorful dishes. The mixtures of cultures in cuisines are especially apparent in areas where people from a certain area settled. For example, on the coast, where many Moorish, African and Chinese people settled, you will find cuisine with these influences. One of the most popular mixed cuisine types in Peru is “Chifa”, or Chinese food. You will find many Peruvian dishes, such as “Lomo Saltado” à vincular con la receta del Lomo Saltado en Recipes, which combine traditional Peruvian food with Chinese. Even the food that is considered to be 'true' Chinese food has definite Peruvian influences.

PRE-HISPANIC INFLUENCE
In the Andes the diet of indigenous people remains nearly the same as it has been for hundreds of years. Staples include corn, potatoes, and meats from animals such as "alpaca" and guinea pigs ("cuy"). The idea of eating a furry little animal may seem repulsive to many foreigners, but "cuy" is considered a delicacy and served in the majority of restaurants in any Andean city. The most traditional way to eat a "cuy" is "chactado" which mean crushed. Old Peruvian used to roast the "cuy" between two hot stones. Nowadays, this technique has changed and now in the Andes, people fries the "cuy" with a big weight over to crush it (it can be a stone as well).

The "pachamanca" is also Pre Hispanic as well as the "aji". Although most of Peruvian meals we have nowadays are spiced with "aji", before the arrival of the conquistadores, was used only when it was wartime. Wives used to feed the warriors with big amounts of chili, which burn their liver, the center of angry. They believe was that with the liver irritated, men were fierce enough to attack anyone in the battles.
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